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Best mirrorless camera for beginners

Mirrorless cameras are known for their lightweight which makes them a fantastic choice for easy packing travel and outdoor enthusiasts. By the time DSLR manufacturers like Canon and Nikon will reach the quarterfinals of mirrorless race, Sony and Fuji would have already made it to the finals. It may sound funny but it does hold a lot of meaning when it comes to mirrorless camera technology. Sony has an extensively attractive and versatile line-up of beginner-friendly mirrorless camera bodies, and Fuji is also catching up with time. 
For total beginners who don't feel prepared to learn about metering or histogram yet, an electronic viewfinder is a good choice as it provides an exact view of what the photo will look like. One common complaint I hear about mirrorless cameras is the poor battery back up due to this electronic viewfinder functionality, but it has improved with the latest generation of mirrorless camera bodies. 

Best mirrorless camera beginner


Sony Alpha cropped sensor:

A6000: No in-body stabilization, 1080p video only no 4k. 

A6300: No in body stabilization.  4k video support. 

A6500: Has in body stabilization (IBIS). 4k video support. 


Sony Alpha full frame sensor: 

A7: No in body stabilization (IBIS). 1080p video

A7 II: Has in body stabilization (IBIS). A little bit bigger in size as compared to original A7. 

A7 III: Little on the steep side of pricing with not a lot of things that would help a beginner. 

A7S: Primarily a video camera. Can't say enough good things about the video performance of this camera. 

A7R: 42 MP.  The problem of shutter shock and lossy raw files turned away a huge number of users. 

A7RII: 42 MP. Original problems of A7R were solved. 

A7RIII: Dual card slot vs the single card slot of A7RII. Eye detect AF. 

A9: Sony's sports and wildlife photography focused mirrorless interchangeable lens camera.  20 FPS burst mode. 

From the above lists, A6000 and A7II appear to be the best affordable mirrorless choice for a beginner for stills. If you plan to eventually get into photography as a serious amateur, then A7RII could be a good choice as it has better AF than A7II. If you are looking for another brand mirrorless, Fuji might be a good choice too. Fuji X series is a range of extremely versatile beginner friendly mirrorless cameras. I can't comment much about the individual camera features of Fuji as I have never used them personally. Few Fuji cameras that I have heard in discussions: 

Fuji X-E2
Fuji X-T1
Fuji X-T10
Fuji X-T2
Fuji X-T20

Lastly, there is always micro four-thirds camera brands Panasonic and Olympus which are even smaller than mirrorless cameras. All M4/3 lenses are interchangeable between M4/3 camera systems from any manufacturer. Concluding, mirrorless cameras work a lot different than the traditional DSLR cameras. What is best for you might not be best for others. Happy photography. Share the photography love by sharing this post. :) 

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