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General review of Canon T5 ( 1200D) DSLR camera for photography.

One of my friends bought Canon T5 (1200D) as his first camera for getting into photography. He wanted me to have a general look at it, and I think there is no better topic for another blog post. Here is my view about Canon's entry-level T5 (1200D) photography camera.

Good things:

1) High megapixels: T3 only has 12.2 megapixels, so a decent upgrade to 18 megapixels here. This allows better cropping without losing clarity or details. Bigger sized prints which can be really helpful for landscape photography or fine art prints.
2) Lightweight: Only 1.05 pounds. Easy to carry on hiking and outdoor visits.
3) Full HD video recording: This is a big upgrade over T3 which only supported 1280*720.
4) Increased ISO range: Maximum of 12800 replacing the 6400 limit of T3. 




Canon EOS 1200D
Canon T5

Bad things:
1) No dedicated DOF button: C'mon Canon. Either make the settings option browsing simpler or provide a dedicated depth of field button. I tried reverse lens macro photography with my friend's camera and it was a pain to lock the aperture blades as there was no dedicated button to lock it.
2) No continuous autofocus during the video: T5 has full HD recording (1920*1080) which is a great feature, but it can be disappointing to see blurred subjects just because your camera doesn't know how to autofocus while recording a video. Yes, refocus is allowed while recording is in progress but it doesn't offer a smooth transition and takes a lot of time due to slow AF. This was one of the major setbacks for T5 (1200D) which led many video blogging enthusiasts to have a strong aversion to this camera. T5i has continuous autofocus during video recording.
It would be total injustice to compare an entry level T5 (1200D) with mid or professional level photography cameras like 80D, 7D, 5D Mark II, 5D Mark III, etc. These cameras have fantastic AF, newer processors, higher resolution view screens, fast burst rate, high ISO performance and many more features. However, they cost way more than a T5.

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